Do I Have Anxiety?

To be nervous, to feel butterflies in your stomach before a meeting or an important situation, you are not alone. In fact, we all are like that! It’s normal and common to worry about big events or complex situations where we are involved.

Now, if that feeling is so strong that it prevents you from leaving the house or doing your normal life, then you may be facing anxiety. According to recent statistics, the anxiety disorder is common in our country with more than 3 million cases per year.

There are many reasons why someone could face anxiety, and according to experts almost everyone experiences some sort of it at some point of their lives, but the important part here is to be able to identify it and to treat it in time.

You should know that there are several anxiety-related disorders and even though some of them could be similar and interact with each other, the common elements on all of them are ongoing fear, worry, excessive nervousness, and inability to live normally due to those feelings.

Who can diagnose anxiety? Initially, you! If your fear and nervousness are out of proportion, you may know that something is wrong. But it’s your primary physician or your mental health doctor who can conduct a physical exam looking for symptoms that could underline a relationship with medications or any other medical condition that could be triggering the anxiety disorder.

Once the anxiety is diagnosed you will probably be referred to a psychiatrist specialized in anxiety and its treatment. Your psychiatrist could provide not only counseling and therapy but also medication for your anxiety disorder.

If you believe that you are suffering from anxiety disorder, act now and talk to your doctor. There is treatment and help available.

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Dealing with Pneumonia

 

So you have been diagnosed with pneumonia, and the only thing you know about it is that it could be fatal, or at least that’s what you have heard. Well, truth is that yes, pneumonia could be fatal, but there are different types of pneumonia and its intensity could vary depending on other factors.

The first step is to understand what is Pneumonia. It’s a lung infection usually caused by viruses or bacteria. Once you breathe the virus or the bacteria, it goes directly to your lungs affecting its normal functioning and making hard for you to breath.

People with chronic or long-term diseases like asthma, diabetes, cancer or heart disease are more likely to get pneumonia, and they will need not only an early diagnosis but also a timely treatment. Due to their condition, it’s possible that the doctor decides to do that treatment at the hospital, and not at home.

Some of the symptoms related to pneumonia are fever, shortness of breath, cough, mucus, and fatigue. However, there are other symptoms that could be present like nausea, diarrhea, chest pain, and shaking. In some cases, patients could develop the disease without major symptoms; the key to a prompt and complete recovery lies in the fact that once the symptoms begin, you seek medical advice. If you already have a diagnosis, it’s very important to follow your physician instructions and recommendations.

Don’t rush the recovery! Get plenty of rest, and drink plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration. If a cough is preventing you to sleep or rest, talk to your doctor. If your doctor prescribed antibiotics, you will need to finish the whole dosage recommended. Your recovery time will depend on the type of pneumonia, but have in mind that we are talking about a period that could go from 2 to 4 weeks before you regain your strength.

There is never a good time to get sick, much less to have something like pneumonia, but if you have already been diagnosed, it’s best for you to take things slowly. Use the opportunity to read a good book, or simply to rest and to recharge your batteries.

Panic Attacks, how to handle that fear

Suddenly, you can’t breathe and your heart beats fast and strong, so much that it seems that it’s going to leave the chest. It’s something horrible, it makes you feel helpless, afraid like you can die any moment. You are having a panic attack!

But, where is it coming from, who suffers from panic attacks, and why? We should start saying that those attacks are part of a panic disorder, which is a serious condition that strikes suddenly, without a reason,  just like the attacks where the individual feels like we described before, a racing heart, fear, and overwhelmed even though there is no danger around.

If you have experienced panic attacks, at least twice without any reason, and you try to change events, situations, and habits in your life to avoid another one, you might have panic disorder.

We know the symptoms, but the causes are still unknown in full. Experts have found that panic disorder patients may have a very sensitive brain to fear. Although it can run in your family, there is no certainty about the role played by your genes or the environment where you grew up.

As almost in every case, the most important thing is to get diagnosed on time. There is no a lab test that could help a doctor with the diagnosis, but your physician can rule out other conditions and work with your medical history in order to know what’s happening.

You may be referred to a psychotherapist, the person who, at the end of the day, could help you deal with the changes and situations that might be triggering your panic attacks.

Another important thing to know is that 1 in 10 adults in America suffer a panic attack every year, which means that it could be more common than we imagine and that even though it looks like something very difficult to handle, it is not when you have a good doctor and the support of those around you.